New England Water Science Center

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Welcome to the USGS New England Water Science Center. We provide timely and reliable information to Federal, State, Tribal, and local stakeholders on the water resources of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Our data help safeguard human and wildlife health, public safety, and environmental sustainability. 

For assistance, please contact us through our Connect page.

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Selected Projects

Selected Projects

Explore New England WSC science projects.

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Remembering Irene

Remembering Irene

Tropical Storm Irene made landfall in New England on August 28, 2011, bringing high winds and record setting rainfall. Ten years later, our Center remembers the historical significance of the storm and the USGS response.

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News

Date published: August 21, 2021

USGS Deploying Storm Tide Sensors From NY to MA for Hurricane Henri

As Hurricane Henri approaches the Northeastern U.S., field crews from the U.S. Geological Survey are installing up to 62 storm tide sensors that will track the hurricane’s effects along the Atlantic coast. The sensors are being installed from Long Island, New York, to Cape Cod, Massachusetts; the exact number is dependent on several factors, including weather and road conditions.

Date published: August 11, 2021

New England Water Science Center Associate Director Selections

The New England Water Science Center is happy to announce the selection of Jonathan Morrison as Associate Director of the Applied Hydrology Program and Gregory Stewart as Associate Director of the Hydrologic Monitoring Program. 

Publications

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Year Published: 2021

Model estimated baseflow for streams with endangered Atlantic Salmon in Maine, USA

We present a regression model for estimating mean August baseflow per square kilometer of drainage area to help resource managers assess relative amounts of baseflow in Maine streams with Atlantic Salmon habitat. The model was derived from mean August baseflows computed at 31 USGS streamflow gages in Maine. We use an ordinary least squares...

Lombard, Pamela J.; Dudley, Robert; Collins, Matthias J.; Saunders, Rory; Atkinson, Ernie

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Year Published: 2021

Hydraulic modeling at selected dam-removal and culvert-retrofit sites in the northeastern United States

Aquatic connectivity projects, such as removing dams and modifying culverts, have substantial benefits. The restoration of natural flow conditions improves water quality, sediment transport, aquatic and riparian habitat, and fish passage. These projects can also decrease hazards faced by communities by lowering water-surface elevations of flood...

Olson, Scott A.; Simeone, Caelan E.
Olson, S.A., and Simeone, C.E., 2021, Hydraulic modeling at selected dam-removal and culvert-retrofit sites in the northeastern United States: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5056, 37 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215056.

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Year Published: 2021

Approaches for assessing long-term annual yields of highway and urban runoff in selected areas of California with the Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM)

The California Department of Transportation, commonly known as CalTrans, and other municipal separate storm sewer system permittees in California as well as other State departments of transportation nationwide need information about potential loads and yields (loads per unit area) of constituents of concern in stormwater runoff and discharges from...

Granato, Gregory E.; Friesz, Paul J.
Granato, G.E., and Friesz, P.J., 2021, Approaches for assessing long-term annual yields of highway and urban runoff in selected areas of California with the Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM): U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5043, 37 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215043.